Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 1st Global Geotechnical and Water Resource Engineering Summit , Hong Kong.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Alexander Trofimov,

Institute for Scientific Research in Cosmic Anthropoecology, Russia

Keynote: Work Shop on Aqua-space suit as new geotechnology and universal human preventive mean during of heliophysical and climatic changes

Time : 14:00-14:45

OMICS International Water Resource Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alexander Trofimov, photo
Biography:

Trofimov Alexander received a Diploma of the Doctor from Novosibirsk State Medical University in 1973 and Doctor of Medical Sciences in 1998. After that he served in various posts namely ISA professor in 1999, Academician of International Academy Energy-informative Sciences in 2001, Academician of ABI, USA in 2010, General Director and Chief of Scientific Council of International Scientific Research Institute of Cosmoplanetary Anthropoecology (ISRICA), and Chief of Laboratory helioclimatopathology of Science Center of Clinical and Experimental Medicine of Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Medical Science. He also received DSc from Open International University for Complementary Medicine in India in 1998, and is Member of Organizing Committee of conferences of OMICS group from 2014 to 2016. From 1975 till 2010, he wrote more than 300 scientific works, 7 monographs and received 9 patents. His basic research interests are in heliobiology, cosmic anthropoecology, geoecology, geophysics, helioclimatopathology, preventive medicine and investigation of water as a helioprotective mean. 

Abstract:

We believe that at sequence of climatic and heliophysical events of last time, the main role have our magnetosphere. Accordingly the buffering properties of the geomagnetic field, which protects biosystems from excess solar proton-electron beams, are decreasing. Our main aim was the development at these conditions of preventive non-medicinal geotechnologies. It is shown, that our new technological means, so as informational holograms and drinking water, patented by ISRICA in Russia, has helioprotective properties and contributes to significant positive inversion of the functional dependence of activity of many human functional systems on heliogeophysical impacts. The non-medicinal means on the basis of drinking water treated light-hologram’s impact in the weakened geomagnetic field, which reduces the excess heliomagnetotropic reactions of a man and promotes prevention of crisis states (on an example of patients with hypertension) was developed and successfully tested. Treatment of drinking water by informational holograms in the weakened geomagnetic field, in our opinion, leads to such changes in its nanoclusteral structure, energy-information capacity and bio-catalytic activity that provide heliomagnetoprotective effect in relation to a man on the systemic and organism levels.

  • Hydrometeorology | Water Quality Modelling | Climate Change | Geotechnical Engineering | Fluid Mechanics
Location: Bauhinia
Speaker

Chair

Mehman Agarza Oglu Rzayev

Scientific Production Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Amelioration, Azerbaijan

Speaker
Biography:

Ahmed Abouhend is a PhD student in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering (EWRE) Program at UMass Amherst, USA. He used to work at the National Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Egypt. He did his Masters in Egypt then traveled to the US to pursue his PhD research. He is interested in water quality assessment, wastewater technologies and reactors operations. His PhD research focuses on the oxygenic photo-granules (OPGs) process as a novel technology for wastewater treatment.

Abstract:

Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive industry. About 2.16 MJ of energy is required for the treatment of 1 m3 of wastewater. Since 1912-1914, activated sludge process is the most common technology for wastewater treatment. In activated sludge system, mechanical aeration is required to provide oxygen to the biological flocs (bacteria). Then, the bacterial flocs use this oxygen to oxidize the organic matter and ammonia from wastewater. The process involves oxygen being introduced into the activated sludge system accounts for 25-60% of the overall operational costs. Besides, activated sludge does not settle very well so settling tanks are required to allow the biological flocs to settle. On the other hand, untreated wastewater holds more than 10 times the energy used to treat it. If we can capture this potential energy from wastewater, the wastewater treatment process might become an energy producer rather than a consumer. We propose the oxygenic photogranule (OPG) process for aeration-free wastewater treatment. OPG process is a light-driven wastewater treatment that eliminates the need for mechanical aeration to treat wastewater. These photogranules are enriched with a phototrophic community (cyanobacteria, microalgae) that produces O2 needed for oxidizing organic matter and treating wastewater. Under sunlight, the phototrophs autonomously produce O2 through photosynthesis, which in the activated sludge process should be provided by energy-intensive aeration. In turn, the heterotrophic bacteria within the OPG uses this oxygen to oxidize the organic matter in wastewater and produces CO2 for phototrophs. We evaluated the feasibility of these granules for wastewater treatment in bench and pilot scales. The OPG process can cut the wastewater treatment costs in half through sustaining self-aeration process. Besides, the easily harvested phototrophic biomass could be converted through various pathways to biofuels. This phototrophic biogranule technique would allow wastewater treatment plants to generate most of the energy needed for plant operation.

Morlu Stevens,

Botswana International University of Science and Technology, Botswana

Title: Removal of excess toxic mercury (II) and arsenic (III) from wastewater by fish scales waste materials
Biography:

Abstract:

In this work, fish scales waste remains (FSWR) was employed as an ecofriendly and readily available cheap adsorbent for the removal of toxic mercury (II) and arsenic (III) ions from wastewater. The research focused on the adsorption ability of FSWR as a cost-effective technology for treatment of mercury (II) and arsenic (III) contaminated industrial wastewater. A FSWR sorbent was prepared and its morphology evaluated. The sorbent had a round shape and rough surface with a particle size of ≤63 µm. Batch adsorption experiment was conducted to examine the effects of FSWR dosage, pH, initial concentration of metal ions and contact time on adsorption of Hg (II) and As (III) from the wastewater. The obtained results showed that, the adsorption of the selected metal ions was FSWR dosage, pH, initial concentration of metal ions and contact time dependent. The optimum FSWR dosage, initial concentration, contact time and pH for adsorption of Hg (II), were found to be at 76.99 mg/L, 22.63 mg/L, 74.48 min and 7.29, respectively, while the optimum FSWR dosage, initial concentration, contact time and pH for adsorption of As (III) were found to be 78.82 mg/L, 23.85 mg/L, 63.89 mg/L and 7.78 mg/L, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that pseudo-second-order reaction model best described the adsorption process. Using Langmuir isotherm model, the equilibrium data yielded the following ultimate capacity values for the FSWR: On a per gram basis of FSWR: 35.83 mg/g and 33.93 mg/g for As (III) and Hg (II), respectively. The thermodynamic study shows that the adsorption of the ions was endothermic in nature. The negative values of ∆G reveal the feasibility and spontaneous nature of the process. The study showed that FSWR can be efficiently used as low cost alternative for removal of metal ions.

 

Tae Jin Kim

Daegu University, South Korea

Title: Key factors for flood control operation
Biography:

Tae Jin Kim has been involved in various aspects of water and environmental fields, including watershed management, water availability, river basin hydrology and management of river/reservoir system and optimization. His specific fields are watershed protection plan focused on surface runoff, base flow and salinity, urban stormwater management focused on food and water pollutant, multiple reservoir system operation, optimization, decision support system and watershed flood management.

Abstract:

The monthly time step Water Rights Analysis Package Model (WRAP) is one of the components in the Texas Water Availability Model (WAM) system. Sub-monthly time step capabilities to conventional WRAP based on the monthly time step has been added. In this study, focus was given to key variables for simulating sub-monthly time step WRAP as follows: Disaggregation of monthly inflow and routing parameters computation. The daily flow pattern method was utilized for disaggregating Brazos River Authority Condensed (BRAC) monthly inflow and routing parameters based on length are computed. The USACE Southwestern Division Reservoir System Simulation Model (SUPER) model daily unregulated (naturalized) flows from 1939 to 1997 were used to develop daily flow patterns for disaggregating BRAC monthly inflows. The mean values of the daily naturalized flow for 1939 to 1997 were used as the flow pattern for 1900 to 1939 and 1998 to 2007. Also, these daily flow patterns were distributed to the other ungagged control points. The lag times at control points of the BRAC data set were computed based on the distance of the reaches with consideration of the lag time computed using the SUPER daily naturalized flow. The Muskingum routing parameters (K) were also computed based on the distance of the reaches. The key variable evaluated in this study provides a sufficient level of accuracy for using the model in flood control operations for a multiple-reservoir system. However, further refinements are possible by spending more time and effort to compile more detailed data.

Speaker
Biography:

Kanhu Charan Patra has experience of 35 years in the field of water resources and hydraulic engineering. He has authored 8 books in water resources engineering and published more than 200 papers in the international journals and conferences. He has worked in the water resources engineering departments over a decade gaining unique experience in the planning, design, construction and management of water resources projects. Presently, he is working as a Professor, gaining experience in research, evaluation, teaching and administration

Abstract:

Statistical downscaling has become a convenient tool to bridge the gap between the scales of the outputs of GCM and the weather parameters needed for hydrologic analysis. Over the years many innovative methodologies have been developed and tested for the statistical downscaling to assess the impact of climate change on the hydrologic processes. In this study, three different methods of downscaling are studied for the Brahmani-Baitarani river basin for the Indian catchments: Classification using KNN, regression using multi-linear regression and change factor using Delta method. The comparison is based on 3 GCMs from the phase 5 of Coupled Model Inter-comparison (CMIP 5) and for the RCP 8.5 scenario. The observed data is taken from four meteorological stations spread over the basin. Various performance evaluation tests like coefficient of determination (R2), normalized mean square error (NMSE), Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and percentage bias (PBIAS) are implemented to evaluate the different methods. Kolmogorov Smirnov (KS) test is applied to the three different methods so that comparison can be done of the distributions of the modelled values to the distribution of the observed data sets. Each method has its own set of virtues and vices. All the three methods are able to capture the pattern of monthly rainfall adequately.