Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 1st Global Geotechnical and Water Resource Engineering Summit , Hong Kong.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Hi-Ryong Byun

Hi-Ryong Byun, Pukyong National University, South Korea

Keynote: Available water resources index as an innovation on water quantity environments

Time : 9:15-10:00

OMICS International Water Resource Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hi-Ryong Byun photo
Biography:

Hi-Ryong Byun had been a Weather Forecaster in Korean Air Force for 19 years. In 1982, he faced and experienced a very hard situation of drought and started to study drought. After separation from Air Force, he became a Professor who taught the Synoptic Meteorology. In Pukyong National University, he wrote many articles on natural disasters like thunderstorms, fogs, typhoons, floods, heat waves, etc., especially more articles on drought and made the EDI (Effective Drought Index). He has acquired many patents that mitigate the damages from disasters. Patents against global warming, drought and algae are his masterpieces.

Abstract:

With a new parameter that synthesizes the precipitation amount and its time intervals, this study would like to show a new research field of water quantity environment. The dangers of flood, drought and land slide etc., are caused not by the precipitation sum but by the Available Water Resources Index (AWRI) that is the remained water that diminished along time pass by runoff and evapotranspiration, etc. after precipitation. To calculate AWRI, only a simple logic that says the longer the time passes after precipitation, the smaller the AWRI becomes is adopted. The differences caused by topography, soil texture and ecosystem etc., can be adjusted using the statistics when necessary. Originally the summation duration of precipitation in AWRI is 365 days because it is the main periodicity of precipitation on the whole world but it is elongated to 365+n-1 when the anomalies of AWRI is consecutively negative or positive for n days and it should be recalculated along revised duration. With the use of AWRI, drought diagnosis became more reasonable by using EDI (Effective Drought Index) and its prediction possible. The big Korean droughts on 2012 and 2015 were predicted at 2008 and it is proved true. Every next year’s May drought became predictable in early October when AWRI showed the maximum. It was also found that over 470 mm/day of AWRI at the Dobong observatory make the Eastern Trunk Road of Seoul inundated. This means early warning of flood-like disasters is possible as soon as precipitation is observed or predicted. Besides, water seasons divided into the little water season and the abundant water season not along the rainy days but along the water quantity and the big spatial differences of water environments were digitized for agricultural use

Keynote Forum

Dirk Mallants

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia

Keynote: Constraining groundwater flow model uncertainty: Workflow and application to deep low-permeable formations

Time : 10:00-10:45

OMICS International Water Resource Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dirk Mallants photo
Biography:

Dirk Mallants has a background in soil and groundwater hydrology with more than 25 years of experience in characterizing and modeling water flow and contaminant transport in complex environments; typically variably-saturated soils, aquifers and low-permeable porous media including deep clay formations and fractured concretes. He contributed to establishing one of the most extensive datasets on hydraulic conductivity of aquitards. Integrating experimental observations and numerical modeling has always been at the center of his research. His work includes parameterization of pore-scale and field-scale spatial variability in flow and transport properties, modeling processes of water flow and contaminant transport across a range of spatial scales and the evaluation by means of process-based models of management options for water-related environmental pollution problems. He has extensive experience of working across a range of scales to understand dynamics of groundwater systems and the impact of resource extraction on the groundwater resource and groundwater dependent ecosystems.

Abstract:

Large-scale groundwater flow model predictions are generally highly uncertain due to poorly constrained hydrogeologic properties, boundary conditions and geologic layers. The present study demonstrates a generic workflow to iteratively constrain prediction uncertainty by obtaining improved estimates of the most sensitive model components and incorporating them in updated simulations. A case study was developed in which an initially poorly characterized low-permeable formation, a so-called aquitard, was subject to improved characterization resulting in better constrained estimates of hydrogeologic properties. This study used an existing large-scale groundwater flow model in the Gunnedah Basin, New South Wales, Australia as the basis for the quantification of prediction uncertainty. Predictions generated by the flow model included the magnitude and timing of maximum drawdown in a confined aquifer separated from a stressed groundwater system by a sequence of deep aquitards. A global sensitivity analysis revealed the vertical hydraulic conductivity (KV) as one of the most sensitive groundwater system parameters, which was subsequently subject to improved characterization. Porosity-permeability relationships obtained on core samples were combined with downhole neutron-density logs to generate high-resolution vertical KV profiles. These were then up-scaled to the scale of the aquitard formation using analytical and numerical methods. Monte Carlo sampling from hydrogeologic parameter prior distributions was used to estimate the uncertainty of groundwater model predictions before and after improving the characterization of aquitard KV values. Independent estimates of aquitard-scale KV were derived from a 1D transport model interpretation of a profile of natural tracer. Monte Carlo simulations using a spatially uniform aquitard KV model did not considerably change groundwater model predictions. The groundwater model predictions were best constrained when the spatial correlation structure of KV was explicitly accounted for in the Monte Carlo simulations. The workflow allows for an iterative updating of those uncertain parameters to which the model is most sensitive.

 

Keynote Forum

Kelly Cristina Tonello

Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil

Keynote: Inclusion of hydrological indicators in the evaluation of forest restoration

Time : 11:00-11:45

OMICS International Water Resource Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kelly Cristina Tonello photo
Biography:

Kelly Cristina Tonello has a graduate degree in Forest Engineering, Master's degree in Forestry Science from the Federal University of Viçosa (UFV) and PhD from the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP). She is a Lecturer at the Federal University of São Carlos/Sorocaba-SP Campus and Collaborating Researcher at the Faculty of Agricultural Engineering (FEAGRI) at UNICAMP. She focuses in hydrology lines, in forest ecosystems, water conservation, river basin management, recovery of degraded areas, forest ecophysiology and payments for environmental services. She is also a Coordinator of the research group on hydrology in forest ecosystems (Hidrolef).

 

Abstract:

Due to the complexity of the biological interactions with the abiotic factors of the environment, the current focus of the environmental recovery is almost exclusive in the biological component, not knowing at what point during the vegetation development, the restoration contributes to the water maintenance. In what moment and how it will interfere in the water balance of a hydrographic micro basin? This work aims to characterize the behavior of hydrological parameters in forest areas at different stages of restoration by conducting the natural regeneration in order to insert them as a tool to evaluate the restoration. For this, a micro basin was selected, where three plots were demarcated for each treatment with different ages of succession (Treatment 1: 4 years, Treatment 2: 10 years) and a fragment without human interference (Treatment 3: 43 years). The research characterized and evaluated the conditions of natural regeneration through vegetation structure indicators and in each plot, an open precipitation, effective precipitation, throughfall, stemflow and interception was characterized. The vegetation diversity and structure indicated an increasing trend in both number and richness among treatments. The species and families present in each treatment are acting in the process of natural succession. Regarding the hydrological parameters, there were significant differences between the three areas studied. It can be noticed that the interception and stemflow have increasing behavior as the natural regeneration progresses, while the throughfall and the effective precipitation decrease. With the advancement of the natural succession there was an increase in the vegetal parameters and improvement of the soil parameters. On the other hand, the hydrological parameters showed specific behavior for each treatment, indicating that they are able to respond to the state of maintenance and development of the vegetation.

Keynote Forum

Alexander Trofimov

Institute for Scientific Research in Cosmic Anthropoecology, Russia

Keynote: Water as important geoecological resource for the strategy of humanity’s survival

Time : 14:00-14:45

OMICS International Water Resource Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alexander Trofimov photo
Biography:

Trofimov Alexander received a Diploma of the Doctor from Novosibirsk State Medical University in 1973 and Doctor of Medical Sciences in 1998. After that he served in various posts namely ISA professor in 1999, Academician of International Academy Energy-informative Sciences in 2001, Academician of ABI, USA in 2010, General Director and Chief of Scientific Council of International Scientific Research Institute of Cosmoplanetary Anthropoecology (ISRICA), and Chief of Laboratory helioclimatopathology of Science Center of Clinical and Experimental Medicine of Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Medical Science. He also received DSc from Open International University for Complementary Medicine in India in 1998, and is Member of Organizing Committee of conferences of OMICS group from 2014 to 2016. From 1975 till 2010, he wrote more than 300 scientific works, 7 monographs and received 9 patents. His basic research interests are in heliobiology, cosmic anthropoecology, geoecology, geophysics, helioclimatopathology, preventive medicine and investigation of water as a helioprotective mean. 

Abstract:

In conditions of continued decrease in induction of the Earth magnetic field, reduction of its buffering properties and corresponding increase in access of solar corpuscular energy flows to biosphere, the problem of surviving of humanity and biotechnological protection of all living on our planet is becoming one of the most actual concerns. The aim of the study was development and approbation of effective non-medicinal helioprotective means on the base of drinking water, widely available to the population of different countries. As a result of scientific research in 2007-2016 such remedy was found–it is water, which has passed a special technological processing in the installations with weakening of the magnetic field of the Earth many times (patent of RF № 2342149) (photos 1,2). It has been shown that drinking water «HELIOSTAR», after its exposure in these conditions, acquires the most important qualities of helio-magneto-geroprotector, Thus the range of new technologies of preventive medicine is replenished by effective non-medicinal helio-heroprotective means, which can reduce helio-dependence of an organism, risks of many heliodependent diseases and rapid speed of human aging. Resource of new type of drinking water should become one of the main elements of the global system of geoecological life-supporting and survival of humanity at modern conditions of cosmoplanetary changes.

 

  • Ground Water | Remote Sensing and GIS for Watershed Analysis | Watershed Management | Water Resource Planning and Management | Environmental Engineering | Hydrology
Location: Bauhinia
Speaker

Chair

Mehman Agarza Oglu Rzayev

Scientific Production Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Amelioration, Azerbaijan

Session Introduction

Yilang Shen

Wuhan University, China

Title: A hierarchical approach for change detection of water areas using a multi-scale tile map

Time : 11:45-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Yilang Shen is a PhD candidate in Resources and Environmental Science Institute, Wuhan University. His major specialty contains computer vision, cartographic generalization and spatial data quality.

Abstract:

The data source of spatial data for change detection can be divided into raster and vector format. In traditional methods of change detection, remote sensing image is the primary raster data for change detection. In this paper, we describe the use of a new type of raster data, tile maps, to detect the change information of multi-scale water system. From the perspective of spatial cognition, we propose the theory of hierarchical change detection of water areas based on the multi-scale tile map. The detection level of multi-scale water change is divided into three aspects: macro level, medium level, micro level. We also classify the changes of water areas and establish a set of indicators and rules used for the change detection of water areas in the multi-scale tile map. In addition, we solve the key technology in the process of water extraction from a tile map. For evaluation purpose, the proposed method is applied in several test areas from TianDi map in China. After evaluating the accuracy of change detection, our experimental results confirm the efficiency and high accuracy of the proposed methodology.

Speaker
Biography:

Mushombe Muma is an Associate Professor at the Université Nouveaux Horizons in Lubumbashi, DR Congo. His specific research areas includes modeling of surface-subsurface water interactions at the watershed scale, analysis of land-use patterns or human activities and climate change impacts on groundwater recharge or river flows, modeling of water losses from crops, analysis of physical and hydraulic properties of soils.

Abstract:

A comprehensive sensitivity analysis study of CATHY (acronym for catchment hydrology model) application was performed with the basic objective of identifying the most influential parameters with respect to: (1) tile-drain flow and (2) edge-of-field flow of the Bras d’Henri, an agricultural micro-watershed in Quebec, Canada. CATHY is a coupled physically-based spatially-distributed model for surface-subsurface flows. Simulations were performed by coupling SENSAN (sensitivity analysis), a tool or a library of parameter estimation of PEST (Parameter Estimation) software and R to CATHY. One screening method of sensitivity analysis and two global sensitivity analysis variance-based methods, namely Morris, FAST99 and Sobol2002, respectively, were used. Of the 24 parameters evaluated using the Morris method, nine and eight parameters, being the most influential on the two output variables, respectively, were used for analysis by the FAST99 and Sobol2002 approaches. According to the Morris method on the one hand, the horizontal saturated hydraulic conductivity greatly influences the volume of water flowing out of the micro-watershed and on the other hand, the flow to the drains depend both on the horizontal and vertical saturated hydraulic conductivities below and above the drains. With regard to the FAST99 and Sobol2002 methods, the edge-of-field flow of the micro-watershed and that at the drains is influenced by the horizontal saturated hydraulic conductivity in the layers underlying the subsurface drainage networks. The highlight of this study is that efforts should be made on characterization of soil anisotropy, that is, this property should be seriously considered for a better understanding of the hydrological processes on a watershed.

Speaker
Biography:

Bantayehu Uba has received BSc degree in Civil Engineering and MSc degree in Civil Engineering (Geotechnical Engineering) from Mekelle and Addis Ababa Universitiy, respectively. Presently, he is a Lecturer in the Institute of Technology, School of Civil Engineering, Hawassa University. He has also served as part-time Lecturer in Institute of Urban Development Studies, Ethiopian Civil Service University and as Assistant Lecturer at Civil Engineering Department of Technology Faculty, Arba Minch University, Ethiopia. He has worked with contractor and consulting private firms in road and building construction and he is serving as a Project Manager at Santamaria Construction PLC.

 

Abstract:

Construction of lightly loaded building and other civil engineering structures such us pavement on weak or soft soil is highly risky because such soil is susceptible to differential settlements, poor shear strength and high compressibility. In developing countries like Ethiopia transportation facilities such as roads, railroads and airfields are very important for sustainable development. However, a better performance of the agricultural sector in particular as Ethiopia’s economic growth is highly dependent on it and the sustainable economic growth of the country at large would be achieved through an improvement of the basic infrastructure. Consequently, the road network has been identified as a serious bottleneck for the economic development of the country. An appreciable part of Ethiopia is covered by expansive soil. Most of the roads constructed and proposed as well as substantial amount of the newly planned railway routes in the country pass through in the heart of expansive soils. The roads on this type of soils fail before their expected design life, in some cases after few months of completion. It has been reported in 2004 that Addis Ababa City Roads Authority had annual expenditure of around 300 million Birr for road construction and maintenance out of which more than 30 million Birr was expended for routine maintenances which is too big and require special attention. The current maintenance and rehabilitation practice also depends more on visual observation and functional evaluations such as surface roughness and visual survey at network level rather than detail pavement evaluation at project level. Major trunk and lower class universal rural access roads failed with in liability period where subgrade soil is black clay soil, but researches show that various treatments such as mechanical, lime and chemical stabilization has been implemented. Moreover, based on the pavement survey, the CBR criteria could not result in reliable solution in case of pavement on expansive subgrade. Thus additional stability criteria should be adopted to resist the heaving condition. Finally, emphasis should be given to the importance in construction in this kind of soil of strictly applying engineered design of geometric, drainage, pavement thickness, material selection and proportioning. Thus, the client, policy makers and other concerned bodies shall decide to accept and control the risk associated with construction on this soil or not or to decide that more detail study is required to allow for extra design and construction pre-emptive measures once the potential problem has been identified and the end user convinced of the cost-savings in adopting a pro-active approach.

Speaker
Biography:

Hi-Ryong Byun had been a Weather Forecaster in Korean Air Force for 19 years. In 1982, he faced and experienced a very hard situation of drought and started to study drought. After separation from Air Force, he became a Professor who taught the Synoptic Meteorology. In Pukyong National University, he wrote many articles on natural disasters like thunderstorms, fogs, typhoons, floods, heat waves, etc., especially more articles on drought and made the EDI (Effective Drought Index). He has acquired many patents that mitigate the damages from disasters. Patents against global warming, drought and algae are his masterpieces.

Abstract:

In Ethiopia, many researches were done on characterizing expansive soils but only a very limited number of studies were conducted on Addis Ababa expansive soil, exists on the unsaturated shear strength behavior. The present study addresses examining expansive soils in Arba Minch; a town in the Rift Valley with great portion of its terrain covered by the same soil but not considered previously. Laboratory-testing program was planned and performed on undisturbed soil samples taken from 10 locations for swelling pressure testing and among these, one pit was allotted for unsaturated shear strength study. The laboratory test results revealed swelling pressure ranges from 74.53 to 571.29 kPa, Plasticity Index from 49 to 77%, Shrinkage Index from 81 to 117% and Free Swell from 94.0 to 165.0%. The results from unsaturated shear strength tests performed with a 50kN modified double wall triaxial machine on an undisturbed sample setting matric suction 100 kPa, 150 kPa and 200kPa for an effective consolidation pressure of 200kPa have clearly indicated the saturated case to yield smaller shear strength than the unsaturated one. The maximum deviator stress showed to increase from 107.61 kPa to 174.35 kPa with an increase in matric suction but the shape of the stress-strain diagram remained identical.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Basahi obtained his PhD for Texas A&M, Texas, USA in 1998.  His speciality is irrigation engineering.  Since his return, he teaches several courses related to his speciality and supervised many graduation projects.  He conducted several research projects that were supported from the university as well as KACST.  He was promoted as Professor in 2007.

 

Abstract:

The study was carried out to understand the influences of flash flood on groundwater suitability in the arid region, Wadi Baysh Basin, Western Saudi Arabia. Groundwater samples were collected from 82 wells and 100 wells, before and after flash flood (FF), respectively and measured EC, pH, major ions and nutrients. Groundwater in the study area is alkaline in nature (pH>7) and the average EC value is 2556 µS/cm and 2265 µS/cm before and after FF, respectively. After FF, the average concentrations of TDS, Mg, Na, Cl, NO3 and EC in the groundwater are decreased in the study area whereas K and SO4 are increased. Groundwater suitability assessment for drinking and domestic uses indicate that 46% and 49% of wells, before and after FF, respectively are suitable for drinking based on TDS. According WHO drinking water standards, most of the samples exceeded highest desirable limit, especially pH, TDS and TH; however, around 60% of groundwater samples are within the maximum allowable limit. Further, water quality and its suitability for drinking are improved after flash flood recharge especially in the case of TDS, Ca, Na, Cl, HCO3 and NO3. Drinking water suitability maps illustrate that wells in the upstream region come under mostly suitable category except TDS and TH. In the downstream, unsuitable zones became moderately suitable zones after FF except Cl and SO4. Hence, suitability maps suggest that the water quality in the downstream is improved by FF recharge compared to upstream. Irrigational suitability of the groundwater is evaluated using various parameters. Salinity classification indicates that the groundwater samples in the study area fall permissible (C3, 61%) and unsuitable (C4 and C5, 33%) classes. According to Kelly’s ratio, 61% and 69% of wells, before and after FF, respectively are suitable for irrigation. Kelly’s ratio, Mg hazard and Na percentage reveal that the water quality is improved by dilution after FF. USSL classification illustrates that majority of the water samples are plotted on C3S1 (BFF: 50%, AFF: 56%), C4S2 (BFF: 21%, AFF: 19%) and C3S2 classes irrespective of FF. Irrigational suitability maps depict that wells in the upstream region are suitable for irrigation whereas wells located near to the coast are unsuitable for irrigation. Parameters namely TDS, Mg hazard, Kelly’s ratio and Na percentage justify that the water quality is improved after FF by dilution, especially in the downstream region. 

Mehman Agarza Oglu Rzayev

Scientific Production Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Amelioration, Azerbaijan

Title: Rationalization of sustainability of water resources in Azerbaijan under intensive agriculture

Time : 16:30-17:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mehman Agarza Oglu Rzayev has significant experience in irrigation investigations, agriculture water management. He deeply investigated water sector transition from planned economy to the market economy, participatory irrigation management practices. He has proposed application of multilevel assessment approach to define shortages in functioning of the irrigation systems observed at various levels and based on the result of such assessment prioritization of investments required for its modernization. He has suggested applying integrated approach for improvement of irrigation management to achieve sustainability in irrigated agriculture. His recent articles devoted to the analyses of water management techniques at various levels, comparable analyses of irrigation sector reforms and state water management policy.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Azerbaijan Republic suffers from insufficiency of internal water resources. Trans-boundary inflow from neighboring countries is amounted averagely 70% from total renewable freshwater resources. 70.6% of total fresh water was consumed for irrigation in 2015. Future sustainability of water resources depends on the volumes of inflows into the country and irrigation management, including modernization of the existing infrastructure. Recently the government has outlined strategic goal to achieve sustainable usage of land and water resources in agriculture by establishment of the environmentally friendly food production systems and improvement of irrigation. This task requires elaborating integrated measures based on the assessment of the functioning of the existing irrigation infrastructure.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The peculiarities of irrigated agriculture and climatic changes have been considered as the key indicators, directly affecting to the sustainability of water resources usage at national and basin level. The current irrigated agriculture practices and influencing factors have been reviewed with the analysis of statistic data, reports from service entities, findings by the international organizations, collected own data as well as other sources devoted to this problem.

Findings: The current problems of irrigation is originated from drastic agricultural land fragmentation, significant water losses during abstraction, distribution and irrigation in the field, outdated irrigation facilities, poor irrigation management especially at on-farm level, the number of deficiencies observed in the current farming system. The newly adopted road map needs to be realized through supported integrated and interlinked measures to balance with environment friendly agriculture production and sustainable water usage in irrigation.

Conclusion & Significance: The policy of efficient water resource and its use can be achieved in case if proposed, measures are applied on integrated and uninterrupted way in all levels of irrigation management. These measures cover engineering and institutional improvements for better water resource management in irrigation.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Lila Prasad Limbu (M.A), Lecturer at Ratna Rajya Laxmi Campus , Tribhuvan University, is trained in Rural  Development department. He is also trained in research methodology from Aims International College (AMS), Central Department of Rural Development in Kirtipur,Tribhuvan university and Impact Evaluation research from a number of workshop/training organized/supported . He has more than 15 years of experience in teaching and social science research. His core area is survey research mainly focuses on impact evaluation, Feasibility, Sustainability and development. He is well acquainted with both quantitative and qualitative research. He has considerable working experience with government, and a number of INGOs/NGOs. He has published a number of articles. He has been continuously updating his expertise through various training, workshop/ seminars and research activities.

Abstract:

Nepalese government has been expanding sustainable water system in Nepal. On the process of expanding drinking water systems, the Nepalese government has been trying to involve governmental, non-governmental and private sectors. The governmental sector is leading from department of water supply and sewerage. To fulfill sustainable development goals, local government and NGOs have been conducting many drinking water and sanitation program in different parts of Nepal. However, only 11.06% people get safe drinking water in Nepal. Even more, the percentage mostly covers the urban area. The most of rural people are far away from safe drinking water in Nepal. Due to this, Nepalese government has been involving public and private sector to develop safe drinking water supply system in village area. The Nepal government has been spending money for constructing safe drinking water supply system. The projects lunched by government are not functioning well within two or three years. In the same way, British Gurkha Welfare office has been conducting rural water and sanitation program in different parts of Nepal by helping DFID and British Gurkha Trust. These are more sustainable than the Nepalese government drinking water projects. They need not repair for a long time. If there is existing minor problems, local people immediately repair those things in that projects. So, this study was conducted with objective of comparing the basic standard of sustainability between British Gurkha pipeline rural drinking water supply system and the Nepalese government pipeline rural drinking water supply system for reconstructing the sustainable rural drinking water supply system for rural area. So, in the research article the compulsion theory of sustainability in rural drinking water project explores the causes of sustainability of rural Gurkha Welfare pipeline drinking water supply system and weakness of Nepalese government rural pipeline drinking water supply system in Basantatar Village Development Committee in Dhankuta district. The study is mainly based on primary and secondary data which were collected by using field survey, discussion, focus group discussion and observation methods with help of structured questionnaires and check-list. Finally, it concludes that compulsion is major element for sustainability for the rural pipeline drinking water project.